My new book of poems is now available

My book of poems, What Those Light Years Carry, is now available on Amazon and through my publisher, Kelsay Books. These poems were written over the last 5-7 years.  I have so many people to thank, but in particular, I want to say thanks to Patricia Frolander, the former Poet Laureate of Wyoming, for encouraging … Continue reading My new book of poems is now available


The Woman In Accounts Payable

I generally shy away from poetry about the office, but sometimes the subject is too rich to ignore. Here's a new poem mine recently published in the online journal Amaryllis.  It's called "The Woman in Accounts Payable:" The Woman in Accounts Payable The woman in Accounts Payable gets cancer of the stomach. She shows up … Continue reading The Woman In Accounts Payable

Writing metrical poems

Before I seriously began writing poems over a decade ago, I studied metrics for about six months.  I started by reading Timothy Steele's All The Fun's In How You Say a Thing: An Explanation of Meter and Versification and also William Baer's Writing Metrical Poetry.  Then I wrote nothing but metrical verse for about nine … Continue reading Writing metrical poems

The paradox of poetry

Most would agree with the idea that writing (and reading) poetry connects us to a deeper level of consciousness and meaning in the world. This view is somewhat overly dramatized in this scene from the character John Keating (John Keats, anyone?) in Dead Poet's Society. Hopefully, by now you've realized poetry will not bring … Continue reading The paradox of poetry

How to scan a poem

Despite what we've learned in school, there is no "correct" scan of a poem sitting in a vault somewhere for only English teachers to see.  Often, scansion relies on context, but even then, what one person hears as a stressed syllable another person hears as unstressed.  And within stressed syllables, the degree of stress can … Continue reading How to scan a poem

Good Poems: “Poet Warning,” by Jim Harrison

The best poems often involve compression. They create their emotional response with as few words as possible.  The poem "Poet Warning," written by Jim Harrison, is one of them: Poet Warning He went to sea in a thimble of poetry without sail or oars or anchor. What chance do I have, he thought? Hundreds of … Continue reading Good Poems: “Poet Warning,” by Jim Harrison